Tag Archives: Cedric Hardwicke

The Set of 400: #108 – My Favorite Goat Co-Conspirator

Today! Because I’m deaf, you know, but I can hear the bells –

The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939)

Directed by William Dieterle

Starring Charles Laughton (x3), Maureen O’Hara (x2), Cedric Hardwicke (x2), Edmond O’Brien (x3), Thomas Mitchell, Alan Marshal (x2), George Zucco (x2), Harry Davenport, Katherine Alexander, Walter Hampden, Arthur Hohl (x2), Barlowe Borland (x2), Rondo Hatton

Like many high schoolers going through a classic literature/stage and screen musicals/black-and-white horror movie phase, I got way into versions of Hunchback circa 1996. Now sure, you can rightly ascribe this to Disney’s ballsy animated musical being released that year, but I was also two years removed from reading Victor Hugo’s Les Miserables, so I had landmark French novels on the brain. And yes, reading Les Miserables was probably spurred on by my exposure to the musical, but I’m pretty confident I read the book first. Is that still a thing? People wanting to read the book before seeing a movie/TV version of something? I don’t always do it, but I’ve also delayed seeing movies for years because of this. I didn’t see V for Vendetta until like three years ago, because I had the graphic novel and couldn’t get around to reading it. And I’ve preemptively read a bunch of books and then not bothered seeing the movie if the trailers looked stupid (I’ll get around to watching Mortal Engines one of these days, I figure).

I don’t know, it looked okay, I guess

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The Set of 400: #200 – My Favorite Swiped Candlesticks

Today! Because I will take you in the end! You know I will!

Les Miserables (1935)

Directed by Richard Boleslawski

Starring Fredric March, Charles Laughton (x2), Cedric Hardwicke, Florence Eldridge, Rochelle Hudson, John Beal, Frances Drake, Jessie Ralph (x2), Ferdinand Gottschalk, Jane Kerr, John Carradine (x2)

Still the best film version of Victor Hugo’s novel (even if it lops off the final quarter of the story), 1935’s Les Miserables brings the 1,100 page novel in under two hours, and manages to cover pretty much the whole main plot. If you’re a huge fan of the book or the musical – and come on, who isn’t? – there is plenty glossed over and lost along the way, but if this story has always basically boiled down to Valjean v. Javert, this is the film version for you. Plus, no Russell Crowe singing!

Gah!

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